A digital nomad is a person who doesn’t really live anywhere. They travel the world while working. Their work depends solely on a stable internet connection and whatever device they have with them. So, can you become a digital nomad and is it worth it?

Job Types

To work as a digital nomad, you have to have a line of work that can stand being on the road. Internet jobs that require you to do tasks online or provide content are okay.So, you can be a digital nomad if you are a translator, front-end developer, any type of content creator, among many other options.

The best types of jobs are those that don’t have strict deadlines, so you can take your time finding a good spot with free Wi-Fi. Many hotels, hostels, bars, and cafes provide this service, so you don’t need to spend money on a roaming data plan.

Country of Origin

The online market is competitive, and companies outsource their work all the time. The problem with this equation is that there are plenty of difficult jobs that don’t pay well. If you originate from a developing country, or a country that has fallen on hard times, internet jobs can be very profitable. That being said, you also need to consider the places you are traveling to.

Destinations

The stronger the economy is in a country, the higher the cost of living there. In these cases, you should just pass through, and consider the countries in question as rest stops. Remember, the question is not whether you can work abroad on the move.

The question is whether you can afford to work abroad.

One of the other problems some backpackers and travelers have is the visa. Many countries are somewhat conservative when it comes to welcoming visitors who don’t have a clear idea of how long they are going to be staying. With the recent immigration scares, it is easy to see why you need to be as inconspicuous as possible.

Challenges

We’ve established that being a digital nomad is feasible, as long as several conditions are met. One of the obstacles you may find is getting a good internet connection. Some countries have awesome internet service, while others take advantage of the fact that they have a monopoly over the market.

In case you are having trouble in this endeavor, or are planning a long trip around the world, it might be a good idea to get a mobile hotspot device. Do your research on devices that can minimize your costs without jeopardizing your work. For example, Karma Go is great as a last resort safety net, but it lacks good coverage, whereas Keepgo can be used in the Americas, Asia, and Europe, though it’s pricey.

Finding a place to stay is also tricky. Hostels with common bedrooms are the cheapest option if you can’t find a friend abroad with a good internet connection that won’t mind you staying for a few days. Hotels are usually too expensive, so you should probably give them a pass.